Light of Life Rescue Mission Podcast: HOPE UNVEILED

Jody's Story

October 23, 2019 Season 2 Episode 2
Light of Life Rescue Mission Podcast: HOPE UNVEILED
Jody's Story
Chapters
Light of Life Rescue Mission Podcast: HOPE UNVEILED
Jody's Story
Oct 23, 2019 Season 2 Episode 2
Light of Life Rescue Mission
Jody takes the listeners through her life story filled with struggles, recovery, victories, and transformation.
Show Notes Transcript

Jody takes the listeners through her life story, beginning with her childhood in Ohio, through her move to Pittsburgh, her college experience, and her adult journey through 20 years of addiction. Listen to hear her struggles, victories, transformation, and her life now.

Speaker 1:
0:01
Welcome to light of life rescue missions podcast, hope unveiled, where you hear stories of hope and change from clients, staff and volunteers. This is Jodi's story.
Speaker 2:
0:15
I came from a great family. Um, I mentioned before my parents. Uh, we had been married for 60 years and I'm just always very loving, very supportive. I have two older brothers. I'm the youngest, I'm the baby and I'm the only girl. So of course I was spoiled rotten. Um, I had a really terrific childhood, you know, lots of family camping trips and vacations. And, um, the thing is that we moved several times and I think that's what triggered a lot of my issues was the fitting in. And every time you move you have to find new friends and new people to hang out with and you kind of have to, you know, adapt to, you know, where you are. And I think, um, when I, the last move I had, it was in eighth grade, which was the hardest. So both of my brothers had already graduated high school and, um, I was in eighth grade and we moved here to Pittsburgh and it was really tough and I can remember just like doing whatever I needed to do to fit in, you know, like smoking a cigarette or, you know, sneaking out of my house or something, you know, just because I wanted friends, I wanted people to like me.
Speaker 2:
1:22
And so that's kind of where that started. Um, and I started smoking cigarettes. Technically I was about 12 the first time I started, but, uh, that was probably my first addiction. And, um, you know, went through high school. I was, I was a girl drummer was the first female drum captain and my Lebanon high school, which was kinda cool. But as also a jock, I played sports and I also hung out in smoking area, which we did have back in the 80s. I actually had a smoking area for high school students. Um, so it was kind of like, I had no real identity, you know, and I just kind of did whatever I had to do to fit in. I remember a lot of camping trips. We, my dad bought a popup trailer and a lot of times he'd come home from work on Friday and he'd say, Hey, let's just go for the weekend and, you know, pile the kids in the, in the camper.
Speaker 2:
2:11
And we'd just go like, even if we went just a half hour away or an hour away and spend the weekend. And they always used to laugh at me because while they were setting everything up, I was always out like finding people, you know, like trying to meet people. So I would always be running the campsite, you know, while they were setting everything up and getting it, you know, getting dinner ready and all that kind of stuff. Um, you know, and having two older brothers, I just loved it. They, you know, as much as we may have fought, they always watched out for me and always took care of me. And, um, you know, we went to Cedar point, we went to King's Island and, uh, I lived in Columbus, so you know, that there was a lot of those kinds of trips and we didn't have a lot of money, but we had a lot of fun.
Speaker 2:
2:54
And you know, my, I just remember my family being very close, very loving. Um, my middle brother's five years older than me. My oldest brother's eight years older, so that's why when I was in eighth grade, it was right after my middle brother graduated high school that we moved here. So, um, then I was like the only child, you know, it was like both of my brothers were gone and so that was a, you know, kind of a shock to the system. But, um, yeah, my family's just always been very close. My parents are from a very small town in Southern Ohio that I just loved dearly. I consider that my hometown. It's called gal police, Ohio. You've probably never heard of it, but it's right across the river from where moth man is from, if you've ever heard of them off man. And, uh, my parents were actually teenagers through that whole thing.
Speaker 2:
3:40
So we grew up, you know, in this little bitty town and, um, lots of great trips there. I still have relatives there. Um, my aunt and uncle or you know, everybody knows everybody there and they've lived there their whole lives. My parents both went to high school there. Um, it's just like, like I said, I consider it my hometown even though I'm from Columbus, this little town is like very, very dear to me and it's, it's itty bitty. There's probably, well now there's probably about 3,500 people there. They have a central park, you know, that's like a block square and there's a gazebo right in the middle of it. Um, well they call it the bandstand right in the middle of it. And it's right on the Ohio river. It's gorgeous. It's really pretty. So that's, that's probably those. My, my best memories are probably from there.
Speaker 2:
4:30
I just remember being a lot of happy times. My birthday's the, uh, July 3rd, so I spent like almost every birthday there. Um, Bob Evans is from there, believe it or not. So like every birthday was at Bob Evans restaurant and his farm was right there. And my grandmother and Bob Edmonds went to high school together. So like the knew the family and it was just a pretty amazing experience. And my grandmother's house had a big rolling Hill that went right down to the river that we would roll down the Hill and just a lot of really fun times with cousins and being really close to my cousins, my brothers. Um, just a lot of family and it's just, that's what I relate to is a lot of family probably from that point. Um, I guess, you know, it's hard to say where an actual turning point was. I mean, that was a rough year and, uh, but I was still an a, a decent student.
Speaker 2:
5:30
You know, I went into high school and I had a lot of friends. Um, I never felt out of place or anything when I was in high school. Um, it's just, you know, fitting in, I guess, just, you know, going to parties and I was always the one that had the latest curfew because I never got in trouble. You know, I could always have the car, you know, and I always got to stay out later than everybody else. But, um, at the same time, my brother was always getting in trouble. So my parents, I think there was a point where I was kind of like, they were paying so much attention to him cause he was in trouble all the time and like the police and you know, wrecking cars and things like that, that my stuff was like kind of going unnoticed. So I was kind of experimenting with things, you know, and you know, drinking here and there, but nothing really big in high school a little bit.
Speaker 2:
6:30
Um, it was when I went to college that, that was probably the biggest point where, you know, I, I do think I have the genetics for addiction. In fact, my dad's father was the town drunk of this little bitty town and I was telling you about. And um, my uncle was a alcoholic. Um, my brothers, same thing. And so I think when I went to college, and again, that fitting in thing, you know, and I'm just jumping right into what can I do when my parents are gone and now I'm on my own. And you know, it was the only school I ever wanted to go to was Ohio state. Cause I was from Columbus and I actually turned down a four year scholarship to a school in West Virginia because it was an all girls school, but it was a soccer scholarship. They were going to give me a full ride, but I was like, I just want to go to Ohio state.
Speaker 2:
7:26
That was it. So I ended up going to Ohio state and um, very first day I was there, I ended up getting high. And uh, from that point on it was just off to the races. I went to five classes my first semester and I went to no classes my second semester and then I was politely asked not to come back. So that whole year was, um, definitely my turning point. I used to say it was the best year of my life, but now when I look at it, I could see how much damage I did during that year. I wanted to be a veterinarian. That's where, that's why I, another reason why I picked Ohio state cause it has a really good vet school. Um, you know, I graduated with a B average. I was a decent student. I'm from Mount Lebanon, which, you know, carries some weight in places.
Speaker 2:
8:19
And, um, I really felt like, you know, I had my whole future ahead of me and I'd never anticipated having any issues with drugs or alcohol or anything like that. I mean, that was certainly the last thing on my mind. Um, but I remember I moved when I went to school. The, um, they rushed for sororities two weeks early, like two weeks before the year started. And so I thought, well, I'll be in a sorority because again, that's, then I have people that have to like me, you know, if I, that's like an incident group of people that we'll have to hang out with me if I'm in a sorority. And I guess that was such a huge deal for me is to have people that I fit in with. And I went to school two weeks early just to rush. And I am so not a sorority type person that it was like the most miserable time getting dressed up and trying to go to, you know, sorority functions.
Speaker 2:
9:24
And I was just miserable and all I wanted to do is drink while I was there. And, um, but I honestly saw my future as being a veterinarian. I thought I was, you know, just doing like what every other college kid did and I'm just one of those people to like me. And it turned out that my roommate was exactly like me and the two of us were like two peas in a pod for the whole year, you know? And that's just, it just went straight downhill from there. I think my first week of classes, they told us that the vet school, you know, they only accept so many people. And of those people, only 10% are out of state students. And of that 10%, 8% of those are minority. So I was like, you know, and this was like my first week of class. I said, Oh well guess I'm not getting in there.
Speaker 2:
10:19
Let's see what else we can get into. You know? So that was kind of a, um, the point where I just kind of said, Oh well not getting into vet school. I might as well just have fun and do whatever, you know, cause my parents a ton of money basically I used for about almost 20 years, so I definitely eased into it. But the last, you know, the last probably two years, definitely the last eight months was the cliff, you know, the, um, my drug of choice in college was LSD because it was so cheap and we could roll our pennies, you know, and I lived in a tower of 24 floors and it was like my weed guy was on 16, the Coke guy was on 18, you know, that was, the guy was on 22 and I lived on the 24th floor. And so we didn't even have to leave the building.
Speaker 2:
11:15
And also I was, I was 18 when I went there, but I fell under the grandfather clause. They had just raise the drinking age to 21 but if you were 18 before August of that year, you could still drink legally 3.2 beer and wine coolers, that kind of thing. And I could get into all the bars. So, you know, I didn't even have to leave my building. The union was right across the street. I could get a six pack, come back to my building and get whatever I wanted, you know, and my roommate would get a check from her parents one week and I'd get one the next week. And we were just, we just survived like that, you know? Um, we'd get up at seven at night, get ready, go out, come home at four in the morning, eat breakfast in the cafeteria and then go to bed.
Speaker 2:
12:04
Then it was my day. When I look back at it, I feel like when I was in the middle of it, I thought it was great and I was having a blast and having lots of fun. And, but when I look back at it, it feels very empty. You know, feels like I can ha I have that sensation of just having nothing. Um, you know, I disregarded people's feelings. Um, I was just not a good person. Uh, Sherry always likes me to talk about my one roommate who, um, when I first moved in, she was the first person that was there and she had suffered a nine day coma from using cocaine and had found God and we made fun of her. We picked on her. We, you know, she had a prayerless next to her bed that I was on for that whole year and we just absolutely tortured this poor girl.
Speaker 2:
13:07
And I mean, she's on my amends list if I ever found her again. And I have looked for her, but I haven't been able to find her yet. But, you know, she's one of those people that I just, I feel terrible about how we were. I was a horrible person. Um, and yeah, I just feel like there was just nothing in me at that time, even after school and coming home and, um, you know, bad relationships and, um, abusive relationships. And, um, the, the time I got, I mean, I've been arrested many times. Um, when I was about 31, I hit an unmarked police car on the highway doing 98 miles an hour. And I don't remember like I came to doing it field sobriety test and like looking around like what is going on. And I was in Steubenville and I'd started in wheeling and I was going to Pittsburgh and I ended up in stupid.
Speaker 2:
14:11
So I was like, I don't even know what happened. Um, and coming out of the, the, uh, police wagon and handcuffs and shackles and my parents standing there watching that was horrible. Um, but again, this had been, this was 10 years after I was already using, but that's one memory that really six, um, another one when my daughter, my youngest daughter was three and I went out Christmas Eve because it's all about me and didn't come home for Christmas morning. I mean, you know what kind of a mother doesn't come home when their child is celebrating Christmas. And I remember waking up Christmas morning, wherever I was, I don't even remember where it was but, and it was like 10 30 in the morning and thinking, I can't believe I've done this. How am I going to get away with this one? And I went to the hospital and went to the ER and told the doctor I have a problem, you know.
Speaker 2:
15:16
And he saw right through me, he handed me an AA meeting list in a pamphlet and he said go to a meeting. And I was like, what are you talking about? You know? And I went straight to the bar that day, Christmas day and didn't go home until that night and like laid out hospital papers on the dining room table thinking that, well my parents will feel sorry for me cause they'll think that I was trying to get help or whatever, you know, and opening my presence the day after Christmas by myself. That's, that's a bad memory. And that's something I still have to talk about every year around Christmas time cause in my daughter's 21 now. So, but that's one of those things that I have to talk about because it really sticks and one of those things that makes that not in your gut when you think about it, but I could, you know, there's a hundred stories like that. Yeah. One thing I should probably mention too is the daughter that I gave up for adoption when I was 25 and um, she's older than my other daughter, but um, that's kind of a, it's a dark memory, but it's a good memory because I believe it was probably the only
Speaker 2:
16:25
sensible thing I did during my addiction because I knew that I couldn't take care of her. Um, and I remember my dad telling me, if you keep her, neither one of you will ever have a chance at a life. But if you give her up, you might both have a chance, you know. But after having her just spiraling down, just like my using got a hundred times worse after that. And then my other daughter was born when I was 30. So, um, when I was, I was 34 years old, I'm unemployable. I had lost every job I'd had. Um, and I had a regular bar that was close to my house and my mother and I wasn't going home at this point. My daughter was four or she may have just turned five, I believe. And, um,
Speaker 2:
17:20
my mom had a habit of showing up at the bar periodically. Like she would just show up and everybody knew who she was. So all the people would say, Oh, Jodie, your mom's in the parking lot, you know, so I'd go like hide like in the kitchen or in the bathroom or, you know, head out the back door until she left. And, you know, she'd say, Oh, have you seen Jody? And everybody would say, Oh no, Mrs. Johnson, but we'll tell her that you were here. You know? And she would do that a couple of times a week. And finally one day she, uh, walked in the door and I was sitting there on my regular stool and I looked at her and my first instinct was to be very angry because I thought nobody told me she was here, you know, that was my first thought.
Speaker 2:
18:05
Um, and I found out later that it was actually my friends that had called her that day and said, she's here right now. If you come here right now, you will find her. And my mom and I sat down in the other side of the bar that day and I basically just spilled everything that was going on in my life. And she says, you know, you need some help. And I said, okay, you know, reluctantly. And, um, I had a interview at gateway like two days later with a doctor and told him everything that I was using. I was, um, a heavy crack addict at that point, um, alcohol, marijuana. So I told him everything that was going on and how much I was using. And he says, well, you definitely need a detox and rehab. And I said, OK, you know, and uh, he said we should have a bed.
Speaker 2:
18:58
And about four weeks, I said, great. That was music to my years, cause that meant I got another four weeks, you know, um, my parents were not happy about it, but my dad dropped me back off at the bar after taking me. Um, cause I wasn't allowed to go home. And it turned into eight weeks before they called me. And those eight weeks, the fact that I survived is only through God's grace. I mean, there's no other explanation for it. Um, I put as many chemicals into my body as I possibly could. Thinking that every day was my last day. Um, they finally called me one Tuesday and they said, you know, we have a bed for you, when can you be here? And I said, I'll be there Thursday. And proceeded to, you know, just use as much as I could for the next two days.
Speaker 2:
19:58
Um, my dad picked me up from where the place I was staying in somebody's basement apartment, kind of, sort of, not really an apartment, but it was kind of a basement with a bed and a TV and a shower. And he picked me up and he took me home to get some clothes. And I went out to Aliquippa gateway and I stayed there for about 22 days. I don't remember the first two weeks at all. Um, while I was detoxing, I just don't remember. But I know that, uh, after about the 20th day, the staff came to me and they said, um, your money's gone. You know, you've used it up, you have to go home tomorrow. And I panicked, you know, and, and I had actually started to get a little bit of clarity and start to feel like, you know, maybe life is okay without all this stuff, you know, and maybe I could try it.
Speaker 2:
20:55
Um, cause I had no intention of quitting when I went there. But, um, and they said, you know, you have to leave tomorrow. And I really did panic and I went to my therapist and I cried and she says, I don't know what to tell you. This is, these are the rules, you know? And it was the first time I went back to my room and I got on my knees and I prayed. And, um, it's, I didn't really know what to say and I don't really remember exactly what I said. It was kind of like, I don't know what to do. Please help. I, you know, I really want to try this and see how it works. And the next day the staff came to me and they said, um, we found you two charity nights and you can stay for two more days. And I had no, nobody's ever heard of a charity night.
Speaker 2:
21:42
You know, I, since then, I've never heard of anybody ever getting a charity night. And so I remember they found me a halfway house to go to. Um, and I went to have an interview on Thursday at this halfway house, um, which was power, which is another fabulous organization. And I went there and they said, Oh, you'll be great. We, we'd love to have you. Um, it was a six month program and they said, but we don't take new people in on Fridays because we have a skeleton staff over the weekend. We want you to have the full effect of all of the help that you need the first weekend that you're here. So we don't take people on Friday. And I went back to my therapist and I cried again and I says, I said, you know that it's either going to be one of two things I'm either not going to use for the weekend and I'm not going to go to power on Monday because I'm going to think I have it lit or I'm going to use when I go home.
Speaker 2:
22:39
And then I'm not going to go to power Monday because I'm going to be too busy. Use it. And again, she says, I don't know what to tell you. You know, these are the rules. And I went to my room again and got on my knees and prayed and the next day power called and he says, you know, we'll take her today. Now I can't explain how that works. Um, but I know from that point on, my whole mentality changed and I think it needed to happen for me that way, to have that faith and that, that surety, that there was something there. Um, and then from that point, my faith just grew and grew and grew and I spent six months in this halfway house and actually worked a program and started to get healthy and started to do the things that I needed to do and find a sponsor and go to meetings and, you know, work with therapists and all that kind of stuff.
Speaker 2:
23:37
And by the time I got to the end of that program, I just wanted to, like, I wanted to go back to school, I wanted to get a job, I wanted get a car, where did it get an apartment? It's like all that stuff, you know? And I graduated in December of 2003 and we were trying to find some housing and, and that's when light of life popped up, you know, and I'd never heard of it. And she says, it's a program that, you know, you tend their program, they help supplement your rent and you know, they'll teach you some skills and this and that. And I was like, okay, well what the heck? And I thought, again, I just wanted it like a means to an end, you know, how do I get what I want by doing the least amount of work? You know?
Speaker 2:
24:22
And I walked in the light of life in January of 2004. And, um, I mean, it, you know, the, the way my life changed after that is it's measurable. And I probably could never do it any justice by trying to explain it, but, um, I remembered just like some Bible studies that really touched me. Um, just different activities that we did that I, I just got so connected to, um, ms anger teaching me computer skills, um, you know, learning how to be a mom again, having my daughter there with me and she was five at the time, um, and her wanting to be there, you know, and just having those wonderful experiences. Again, I can remember taking her to see Santa that Christmas and waiting in line and just crying in the mall, like looking around like, how amazing is this that I'm actually here for this?
Speaker 2:
25:21
Cause I'd never done that. And just looking at the decorations and thinking, this is the most amazing thing. I could've missed this. You know, and I missed the first five years of her life. I really did. I missed her first day of school. I have a picture of it, but I wasn't there, you know. Um, just things like that that really started touching me, you know, and made me really want to explore my faith, my relationship with God more and more and more. And um, you know, Sherry's amazing. Um, every time she talks to me, I see God, I don't know how else to explain that either. And I can remember graduating and trying so hard to talk with that lump in my throat, you know, and my mom was very ill at the time and my dad was in the audience during graduation and trying to talk to my dad and like cracking my voice.
Speaker 2:
26:16
And they had never seen that from me, you know, and, and it was just an amazing experience to me. And I did eventually go back to school and, um, I did not ever move out of my parents' house. So, you know, for somebody who just was going there to get their rent paid and this, you know, kind of thing, they never ever paid my rent. But the program was so dear to me and I loved it so much that I still just wanted to go. So she said I could, it's hard to re like I can remember like the first week or so and knowing like, um, you go like Monday through Thursday and then there was a Tuesday night and Thursday night and I can't remember what day I started, but I do remember just looking around like seeing the children there and ms Hannah was there and how happy everybody was and just seeing the other women that were very welcoming and like everybody there, like knew where I came from.
Speaker 2:
27:21
You know, it was like they, it wasn't like me just trying to fit in again. It was like these people really understood what I'd been through. And even though my story might not as be as bad as this person, or it might be worse than this person, um, we all were the same, you know, and I felt like we were the same and I felt like we connected. And um, and I do agree that you're never the same. I mean, you know, after the first month I could just, I couldn't wait to get there, you know, it was like, and I was taking a bus to the trolley, a trolley downtown and a bus over to the North side to get there every day and I couldn't wait. I just loved being there. It was amazing. And back then the place was not as nice as it is in the, you know, where the offices are now.
Speaker 2:
28:13
It was like a dark basement that there were some computers down there where they taught some computer classes in Ingar would teach typing classes and this was in this dark basement. And then the other side had like a bunch of clothing and everything that we would sort every so often. And so, um, you know, but that place is just, it's very dear to me. I wanted to believe that I was always in control of everything. You know, it's like when I was using, I believed I was in control of everything. And then when I got clean, I felt like I should be in control of everything because I was clean. And the fact is that God is in control, period. I mean, I had no control ever. And I think the longer that I stay here and I stayed clean, the more I realized how much I have to learn and, um, that, you know, it's so much easier for me now to turn that over.
Speaker 2:
29:05
And I just think that I was that person that was always, always had to be the best, the perfectionist, the best at everything. The person that always knew what was going on that, um, you know, always had it together. And meanwhile, inside I had nothing together. You know, I was, I was a wreck, but I could never show that. Um, and I think it's easier for me now to to say, you know, I can be vulnerable. Um, I look at other people ask for help and think that it's such an admirable quality, yet I have such a hard time doing it, you know? Um, so I think a lot that what I've learned is that I'm not in control. Um, and I, and I don't have to be, and that's a relief actually, you know? And it's nice to know that I have gotten my side, you know, that I have is grace that I can sit back.
Speaker 2:
29:59
It's like, whew, you gotta handle this because I don't know what to do. So, which I can never do. Before I just felt so empty. Like there was this nothing in here. It was like a shell. And now I just feel so full of everything, you know? Like I feel like I could just spew, you know, I don't know what it is, but I feel very full and my heart feels full. Um, I just want to, you know, I always say, if I could help one person, I feel like my life is a success and I have people that will come and tell me, you know, Oh, you said something this time that was, that really helped me. Or, um, I had, I did a lead once and I had a guy come up to me and he says, you know, you saved my sister's life.
Speaker 2:
30:46
And I don't remember her, but apparently something I said changed her. I mean, those are the things that, you know, who would have ever thought somebody that was like me that was cheating, lying, stealing, you know, just to please myself and to think that I really had some influence on somebody else, you know, making their life better. I mean, that's, that's amazing. That's absolutely amazing. It's bringing care. So, um, you know, I could, I could never, I could have never expected that, you know, and, um, it's been such a journey and I still feel like there's a lot more to go, you know? But I just feel like the, you know, like the light could just burst out of me. I've been, uh, sober for 16 years. May 29th was my clean date. Um, my daughter was five at the time and she's now 21. She turned 21 in April.
Speaker 2:
31:48
She has her own apartment. She supports herself. She's fantastic. Um, she's studying interior design. My other daughter that I was reunited with when she was 12, which was another whole God's story. That was amazing. Um, she's 25 now. She's got her own house. She and her fiance are remodeling their house. They're getting married next October 10, 10, 20, 20. So that's really exciting. And her family is so amazing. Um, you know, her mom tells me stories, like when she would be walking with her in a stroller, she'd say, people would come up and say, Oh, she looks just like you. And her mom would say, well, that's funny because I didn't give birth to it. And so the, I mean, she would tell me all these stories. He's just an amazing person. Her whole family is amazing. Um, I'm just so proud of of them.
Speaker 2:
32:39
She's a nurse. She works at st Claire hospitals. She's just brilliant. Um, I did end up going back to school and at 40, I graduated with my bachelor's degree, criminal justice. Um, I really wanted to work for the FBI or the morgue, which is kind of my thing. Um, unfortunately I was too old. The cutoff is 39, which I didn't know at the time, but so I did get in with the government, but it's a different branch of the government, but you know, my degree did help with that. Um, wow. Uh, let's see. I know I kind of, I try to help my parents now they're in their eighties. My mom was diagnosed with cancer about 30 days after I got clean, so she's been battling cancer as long as I've been battling to keep my clean time, you know, um, I think hers is much worse than mine.
Speaker 2:
33:35
Um, but she's probably the strongest woman that I know. Um, my most inspiring person. And I remember her coming to the halfway house to tell me that she had cancer. And I had been there like maybe 12 days or something. I said, well, I'm coming home coming home and she says, you are not coming home. She said, you're going to stay right here and do what you need to do. Um, you know, very selfless. Um, and I've watched her battle now for 16 years and she's just very inspiring. Um, wow. Life is just really good. You know. I mean, I do have a lot of records of the past, you know, I have health issues, um, you know, financial issues, but I wouldn't change it for anything. It just wouldn't. Um, it's amazing. I've never been married. Um, and I'm probably glad about that. Um, but you know, if it's meant to be, God will make it happen. So everything's good. I'm happy. Content, serene, God-centered, radiant.
Speaker 1:
34:48
Thanks for listening to light of life rescue missions podcast. Hope unveiled. Join us next time for another story of hope and change. Be sure to subscribe and share this episode.
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